Farmer, i.e. entrepreneur. How new technologies can help manage a farm.

Anna Koryczan
23 February 2017
Farmer, i.e. entrepreneur. How new technologies can help manage a farm.

More and more farms in Poland are like modern enterprises. The awareness of farmers in terms of modernization is growing as well as their level of education and the use of new technologies. This does not only apply to the purchase of advanced machines, but also to the management of mobile assets.

A modern farmer begins to associate with an entrepreneur who sets goals and plans for the development of a farm and with a manager of a group of people. “There has been tremendous technological development in the agricultural sector over the last twenty years. Poland’s accession to the European Union gave farmers the opportunity to purchase new equipment thanks to subsidies, and the producers of machinery are racing year to year to improve them. They are mostly focused on performance and costs savings. Systems supporting work in modern tractors enhance the comfort of operation and at the same time, they allow maximum use of machine performance. Cultivation with such equipment saves time and fuel costs. – commented Paweł Baranowski from Agrohandel S.J.

Investments in equipment and machinery entail an increased interest in systems designed to protect equipment from theft and recover it when it is stolen. Each year before the harvest, we notice an increased interest of farmers in modules aimed at finding stolen machines. Representatives of the agricultural sector, managing modernized, thriving farms, think of growing investment and business growth. Large farms cannot afford to delay work as this situation generates financial losses. That is why farmers want to feel safe and they use devices to quickly locate a stolen machine” – commented Dariusz Kwakszys from Gannet Guard Systems , dealing with tracking and the recovery  of stolen machines. Thieves of agricultural machines most often do not expect that they can be secured. For this reason, the process of searching for stolen equipment is facilitated. „Our tracking team often finds criminals by a stolen machine. Thieves do not know that farmers are increasingly protecting their property, and therefore do not look for our unit inside a machine, thinking they will get away with this” – adds Dariusz Kwakszys.

Farmers not only secure their machines with a radiolocation system, but also willingly choose to install GPS monitoring to control the work of people employed on large farms. This enables an employer to keep track of operational parameters such as fuel consumption, employee hours and prevent theft.

“Farmers are increasingly using “precise farming” solutions. They are based on GPS technology. Their task is to support the management of a farm. The system collects information on soil fertility, which makes it easier to select a fertiliser dose at a specific location in the field. Thanks to machines equipped with GPS we have the possibility of very accurate fertilization of the ground. The system makes it easy to work with the sprayer, preventing the uneven distribution of chemicals in the form of overlays and markers. Harvesters equipped with a field mapping system and equipment such as a moisture meter and a scale allow the farmer to analyze harvest results and get better prepared for the next season. Estimated savings on fertilizers and plant protection products using this technology can reach several dozen percent “- explains Paweł Baranowski.

Investing in modern equipment returns quickly to farmers, but it is up to them whether they will be able to manage their “business” and their employees with care. Modern technology does not yet provide farmers with machines that will think and work for them. But maybe it’s a matter of time?

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